Supply Chain Intelligence: Utilizing the Services Hub

Image

It is a given that to manage our supply chain, we have to have as much visibility as possible. Our SCM Control Tower is hooked up with logistics providers, parts suppliers, customers, manufacturing, procurement…did I forget anybody? Yup. The electronic commerce people who move this data all around for us: the Services Hub.

Yes, we are getting good info from these other sources, but our Services Hub could add value too.

Leveraging the Services Hub for Supply Chain Visibility is just one example of what services vendors are capable of. The approach to better visibility is combining existing IT technology with some more unique tools.They have explained the language of supply chain visibility, measuring the value of visibility, and building a solution with a step-by-step strategy.

Read more: http://ec-bp.com/index.php/articles/industry-updates/10554-supply-chain-intelligence-utilizing-the-services-hub#ixzz34UvE7e2S

Brewers to hold open practice, open season Thursday

Image

The Utica Brewers of the Perfect Game Collegiate Baseball League will hold an open team practice at 7 p.m. Monday at Donovan Stadium.

The event originally was supposed to be an exhibition game with the Holyoke Blue Sox, but the Blue Sox were unable to complete their roster because several of their players are still competing in the NCAA tournament. There will be an opportunity to meet the Brewers’ players and get autographs.

The Brewers open the season at the Mohawk Valley DiamondDawgs at 7 p.m. Thursday at Veterans Memorial Park in Little Falls. They visit Glens Falls Friday, and open the home season at 7 p.m. Saturday against the Watertown Rams, and play the Adirondack Trail Blazers at 7 p.m. Sunday, also at Donovan Stadium.

Indiana marks start of $71 million upgrade to freight, Amtrak lines

Image

Indiana Gov. Mike Pence joined representatives from Amtrak, the Federal Railroad Administration and Norfolk Southern Railway yesterday to kick off the $71.4 million Indiana Gateway project to improve rail lines between Porter, Ind., and the Illinois state line.

The project calls for improving track at seven locations on NS’ Chicago Line and one on Amtrak’s Michigan Line. NS will install universal crossovers at five locations and construct a third mainline track at three locations, according to an Indiana Department of Transportation press release.

Pence described the project as a “triple threat that underscores the importance of a multi-modal transportation system capable of efficiently moving both people and freight.”

Amtrak will build a new passing siding near the Porter Interlocking, where NS, Amtrak and two CSX Transportation lines intersect. The project will improve Amtrak passenger-rail service for several routes that terminate in Michigan, Boston, New York City and Washington, D.C.

“Fourteen daily Amtrak trains every day share these tracks with dozens of Norfolk Southern freight trains, all with time-sensitive customers,” said Michael Franke, Amtrak’s chief of state government contracts. “The Indiana Gateway project will improve some of the busiest tracks in the country, adding capacity and increasing the fluidity of all trains.”

The project’s design is nearing completion. Construction is expected to begin this spring and be completed in 2016.

Funded under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, the Indiana Gateway project will complement rail improvements in neighboring states, such as the Englewood Flyover project in Chicago, Indiana officials said.

Tags Limit Visibility

Image

The technology that supports the supply chain is pretty amazing stuff. With the multiple combinations of item tagging, sensing, reading, and recording methods it seems strange that there are still gaps in visibility. Or maybe that’s exactly the problem – too many options from too many directions.

The 2 most engaging and even long-standing tools available to track products are the barcode and RFID. With the longevity and relative ease of integration of the barcode it would seem that every product that has any kind of label attached to it would include a barcode. Peter Bradley sites a Motorola study that found in 2013 only 2/3 of inbound goods carried barcodes. Moreover, the study projected that it won’t be till 2018 that the percentage of inbound goods with barcodes attached will reach 83%.

If it takes 40 years to go from the first barcode scan of a pack of chewing gum to 66% implementation, getting to the projected 83% use rate would seem right on target. That pace of adoption is alarmingly slow. RFID adoption rates seem to be at approximately the same rate but primarily because of the relatively higher price of the tags compared with printing barcodes on paper. Still, the expected advantages of constant inventory visibility would seem to be reason enough to drive adoption of either technology.

FAXinating Solutions at GS1

Image

FAXINATING SOLUTIONS TO EXHIBIT AT 2014 GS1 CONNECT – JUNE 9-12 MARRIOTT MARQUIS AND MARINA COME AND VISIT AND ASK US ABOUT SPICING UP YOUR EDI EFFORT

Officer at Large at NEECOM

Put Some Zing Into Your EDI Effort.
Lack of Resources? Lack of Time? EDI not providing expected ROI?
Are you still manually processing Faxed or Emailed Purchase Orders from your Customers?
Any of this sound familiar?
Faxinating Solutions (FSI) can help you Spice up your EDI effort with:

• Trading partner testing and ramping services
• Outsourcing and fully Integrated EDI translation services
• Low-cost, simple to use desktop or web-based solutions for supplier adoption
• Automated Fax/Email-to-EDI data capture and translation services

Come visit Faxinating Solutions at booth 900 at the 2014 GS1 Connect Conference
In San Diego June 9 – 12 and let us FIRE up you EDI ROI.
http://www.fsiedi.com

Benefits of Bring Brief

Image

With the average attention span clocking in at eight seconds, being able to communicate efficiently is a crucial skill in today’s business world.

Read more about being brief

Professionals are more pressed for time than ever. You must be able to deliver your message succinctly to cut through the noise and make your mark. Brevity is the new standard in business today, says author and entrepreneur Joseph McCormack.

In his new book Brief: Make a Bigger Impact by Saying Less, McCormack argues those who thrive in today’s attention-deficit economy are masters of lean communication, which gives them a competitive edge. Their ideas are heard loud and clear, and they always stand out from the crowd.

“Successful people demand brevity and don’t tolerate it when it’s missing,” writes McCormack. “Busy people quickly lose patience when their peers and subordinates cannot get to the point. If you’re buried under hundreds of emails and are in meetings all day, you don’t have time to waste on people droning on.”

Brevity is so much more than the conciseness of expression. It’s a fine balance between the length of the message and its ability to cause a person to act on it. According to the author, to craft brief and persuasive messages you must master three main areas: awareness, discipline and decisiveness.

Awareness

Brevity can be difficult to master for several reasons, so it’s important to be aware of the situation at hand. Perhaps you are overly confident in what you are saying or comfortable taking up the other party’s time. Sometimes it can boil down to sheer carelessness or unpreparedness. No matter the reason, it is essential to get to the point or risk losing your audience’s attention.

According to McCormack, the average person speaks about 150 words per minute, much fewer than the 750 words per minute the human brain can process. It’s easy to see how a listener’s mind can wander if you’ve failed to draw them in. Be sure to let the other person know what you’re about to say will only take a moment of their time, and be clear, concise and compelling. They’ll be less likely to tune out if they know your idea is packaged tightly.

Discipline

You need to exercise discipline when crafting your message. Preparing an outline of what you are going to say will keep you organized and increase your ability to put everything into context. Don’t be afraid to build in elements such as short stories or visuals, and incorporate humor if possible.

Plot out your BRIEF presentation using the following steps:

1. Background – Outline the background of why you’re speaking today
2. Relevance – Deliver the headline with your takeaway message
3. Information – Set out three key points or elements you’ll be discussing
4. Ending – Signal you’re finished and outline your next steps
5. Follow-Up – Anticipate any questions and finish by covering those points

When having a conversation, there are also ways to keep it on track and under control. Allow the other person to speak and listen with interest, and when a natural pause arises, jump in with open-ended questions to hone in on the information most important to you. Never approach a conversation like a monologue.

Decisiveness

Timing is everything, and knowing when and where to deploy a compact and quick statement can really pay off. Simple and intentional moves like keeping an email short enough it can be read in 30 seconds, or setting the time limit on a meeting to 20 minutes can dramatically increase engagement. In fact, McCormack notes if you say less, people are more likely to agree with you, which can pay big dividends on a sales call. Here’s 10 key moments when you should deploy a succinct strategy:

1. Meetings
2. Social media and email
3. Presentations
4. Sales Pitches
5. Explaining big ideas
6. Information conversations
7. Hiring interviews
8. Delivering good news
9. Delivering bad news
10. Giving updates

There’s a good reason that McCormack uses the catch phrase, “Be better. Be brief.” Distractions abound, so set yourself up to be heard.

“Treat brevity as responsibility, empathy and respect; become a lean communicator,” writes McCormack. “Imagine if you had something important to share with someone who was running out the door to catch a train with little time to spare. Treat all people like that, even when they’re not in a hurry.”

– See more at: http://schooleymitchell.com/english/pulse/pulse_article.php?id=133#sthash.WoAVzPCm.dpuf

Professionals are more pressed for time than ever. You must be able to deliver your message succinctly to cut through the noise and make your mark. Brevity is the new standard in business today, says author and entrepreneur Joseph McCormack.

In his new book Brief: Make a Bigger Impact by Saying Less, McCormack argues those who thrive in today’s attention-deficit economy are masters of lean communication, which gives them a competitive edge. Their ideas are heard loud and clear, and they always stand out from the crowd.

“Successful people demand brevity and don’t tolerate it when it’s missing,” writes McCormack. “Busy people quickly lose patience when their peers and subordinates cannot get to the point. If you’re buried under hundreds of emails and are in meetings all day, you don’t have time to waste on people droning on.”

Brevity is so much more than the conciseness of expression. It’s a fine balance between the length of the message and its ability to cause a person to act on it. According to the author, to craft brief and persuasive messages you must master three main areas: awareness, discipline and decisiveness.

Awareness

Brevity can be difficult to master for several reasons, so it’s important to be aware of the situation at hand. Perhaps you are overly confident in what you are saying or comfortable taking up the other party’s time. Sometimes it can boil down to sheer carelessness or unpreparedness. No matter the reason, it is essential to get to the point or risk losing your audience’s attention.

According to McCormack, the average person speaks about 150 words per minute, much fewer than the 750 words per minute the human brain can process. It’s easy to see how a listener’s mind can wander if you’ve failed to draw them in. Be sure to let the other person know what you’re about to say will only take a moment of their time, and be clear, concise and compelling. They’ll be less likely to tune out if they know your idea is packaged tightly.

Discipline

You need to exercise discipline when crafting your message. Preparing an outline of what you are going to say will keep you organized and increase your ability to put everything into context. Don’t be afraid to build in elements such as short stories or visuals, and incorporate humor if possible.

Plot out your BRIEF presentation using the following steps:

1. Background – Outline the background of why you’re speaking today
2. Relevance – Deliver the headline with your takeaway message
3. Information – Set out three key points or elements you’ll be discussing
4. Ending – Signal you’re finished and outline your next steps
5. Follow-Up – Anticipate any questions and finish by covering those points

When having a conversation, there are also ways to keep it on track and under control. Allow the other person to speak and listen with interest, and when a natural pause arises, jump in with open-ended questions to hone in on the information most important to you. Never approach a conversation like a monologue.

Decisiveness

Timing is everything, and knowing when and where to deploy a compact and quick statement can really pay off. Simple and intentional moves like keeping an email short enough it can be read in 30 seconds, or setting the time limit on a meeting to 20 minutes can dramatically increase engagement. In fact, McCormack notes if you say less, people are more likely to agree with you, which can pay big dividends on a sales call. Here’s 10 key moments when you should deploy a succinct strategy:

1. Meetings
2. Social media and email
3. Presentations
4. Sales Pitches
5. Explaining big ideas
6. Information conversations
7. Hiring interviews
8. Delivering good news
9. Delivering bad news
10. Giving updates

There’s a good reason that McCormack uses the catch phrase, “Be better. Be brief.” Distractions abound, so set yourself up to be heard.

“Treat brevity as responsibility, empathy and respect; become a lean communicator,” writes McCormack. “Imagine if you had something important to share with someone who was running out the door to catch a train with little time to spare. Treat all people like that, even when they’re not in a hurry.”

– See more at: http://schooleymitchell.com/english/pulse/pulse_article.php?id=133#sthash.WoAVzPCm.dpuf

Professionals are more pressed for time than ever. You must be able to deliver your message succinctly to cut through the noise and make your mark. Brevity is the new standard in business today, says author and entrepreneur Joseph McCormack.

In his new book Brief: Make a Bigger Impact by Saying Less, McCormack argues those who thrive in today’s attention-deficit economy are masters of lean communication, which gives them a competitive edge. Their ideas are heard loud and clear, and they always stand out from the crowd.

“Successful people demand brevity and don’t tolerate it when it’s missing,” writes McCormack. “Busy people quickly lose patience when their peers and subordinates cannot get to the point. If you’re buried under hundreds of emails and are in meetings all day, you don’t have time to waste on people droning on.”

Brevity is so much more than the conciseness of expression. It’s a fine balance between the length of the message and its ability to cause a person to act on it. According to the author, to craft brief and persuasive messages you must master three main areas: awareness, discipline and decisiveness.

Awareness

Brevity can be difficult to master for several reasons, so it’s important to be aware of the situation at hand. Perhaps you are overly confident in what you are saying or comfortable taking up the other party’s time. Sometimes it can boil down to sheer carelessness or unpreparedness. No matter the reason, it is essential to get to the point or risk losing your audience’s attention.

According to McCormack, the average person speaks about 150 words per minute, much fewer than the 750 words per minute the human brain can process. It’s easy to see how a listener’s mind can wander if you’ve failed to draw them in. Be sure to let the other person know what you’re about to say will only take a moment of their time, and be clear, concise and compelling. They’ll be less likely to tune out if they know your idea is packaged tightly.

Discipline

You need to exercise discipline when crafting your message. Preparing an outline of what you are going to say will keep you organized and increase your ability to put everything into context. Don’t be afraid to build in elements such as short stories or visuals, and incorporate humor if possible.

Plot out your BRIEF presentation using the following steps:

1. Background – Outline the background of why you’re speaking today
2. Relevance – Deliver the headline with your takeaway message
3. Information – Set out three key points or elements you’ll be discussing
4. Ending – Signal you’re finished and outline your next steps
5. Follow-Up – Anticipate any questions and finish by covering those points

When having a conversation, there are also ways to keep it on track and under control. Allow the other person to speak and listen with interest, and when a natural pause arises, jump in with open-ended questions to hone in on the information most important to you. Never approach a conversation like a monologue.

Decisiveness

Timing is everything, and knowing when and where to deploy a compact and quick statement can really pay off. Simple and intentional moves like keeping an email short enough it can be read in 30 seconds, or setting the time limit on a meeting to 20 minutes can dramatically increase engagement. In fact, McCormack notes if you say less, people are more likely to agree with you, which can pay big dividends on a sales call. Here’s 10 key moments when you should deploy a succinct strategy:

1. Meetings
2. Social media and email
3. Presentations
4. Sales Pitches
5. Explaining big ideas
6. Information conversations
7. Hiring interviews
8. Delivering good news
9. Delivering bad news
10. Giving updates

There’s a good reason that McCormack uses the catch phrase, “Be better. Be brief.” Distractions abound, so set yourself up to be heard.

“Treat brevity as responsibility, empathy and respect; become a lean communicator,” writes McCormack. “Imagine if you had something important to share with someone who was running out the door to catch a train with little time to spare. Treat all people like that, even when they’re not in a hurry.”

– See more at: http://schooleymitchell.com/english/pulse/pulse_article.php?id=133#sthash.WoAVzPCm.dpuf

Time To Cry For Argentina: Government Cracks Down On Foreign E-Commerce

Image

In a determined effort to keep Argentinean money within its own borders, the government recently issued new restrictions limiting citizens to two purchases of goods from foreign e-commerce web sites annually. Not only that, the new laws limit the value of foreign goods Argentineans may buy through the Internet at $25 per year.

Argentineans seeking to purchase more than the allotted amount must register with the government as importers. In doing so, they must comply with Argentina’s import regulations.

 

With help from Penney Vanderbilt