Category Archives: New York State

Central New England Railway Historical Tours

This is a heads up for those planning to join us for the 2016 segment of the annual bus tour along various portions of the former Central New England Railway.
Our trip will take place on Sunday April 3 starting at Waryas Park in
Poughkeepsie.  There is a parking lot on Water street just across from
the Metro North parking garage. within sight of the Hudson River and the Walkway Bridge. The buses cost less on Sunday and traffic is less at least in the morning. It seems like the weather is better the first weeks of April than March and that is another factor. Please notify your friends so that everyone who wants to go has a chance. The price will be $55 per person again.

This years trip will include the former railroad bridge ( now a Walkway) in Poughkeepsie,

The line from Highland to Maybrook and Campbell Hall.
After lunch one of the stops will be the  restored Hopewell Junction
Depot and Museum. and  the newly built replica of the New Haven Switch Tower ss 196.

Then return to Poughkeepsie. As usual lunch will be
provided.

We have planned this trip to reach as many of the remaining historical spots as our intrepid scouts could locate. In many cases we have had to rely on photographs, new and old, to fill in parts of the puzzle. We hope that you will gain a better understanding
of the part that the railroads played in the history and development of New York. As usual, everybody will get a copy of the 2016 CNE Tour guide book. We have a lot of ground to cover so we will have coffee and buses will roll at 9:00. Try to get there by 8:30 or earlier.

The cost of this year’s tour will be $55.00 per person and payment
should be made out to:
Joseph Mato CNE 2016
Joe Mato
62 Wood RD CNE 2016
Redding, CT 06896
(home): 203 938-9992     e-mail: joemato@sbcglobal.net
Be sure to include your E-Mail address so we can contact you if we need
to. If you don’t have
E-Mail then include your phone number.

Any money that is left after expenses will be used as “seed money” for
next years trip.
As we did last year, we have two buses with 47 seats each. In past years we sold all seats and had a waiting list so don’t wait too long to send in your reservation. Please note that any request for refunds must be received thirty (30) or more days in advance of the tour date. If you can find a replacement to take your bus seat, that’s OK just let us know who it is. We have to know who to let onto the bus when the tour starts.
If you can’t find a replacement then we may have somebody on the waiting list to suggest but we can’t refund money that has already been spent on tour expenses.
Bernie Rudberg
7 Marion Ave.
Wappingers Falls, NY    Phone 845 221-9330
12590-6017       E-Mail Brudberg@optonline.net

We will also post information on our WebSite

Cuomo orders higher security measures on mass transit

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo last week signed an executive order that gives New Jersey and Connecticut law enforcement jurisdiction on New York’s public transportation services and facilities.

The order is aimed at allowing security and counterterrorism officials in both states to assist New York in ensuring public safety at locations traditionally targeted by terrorists, according to a press release issued by Cuomo’s office.

“With the busy holiday season in full swing, we are taking every precaution necessary to mitigate potential terrorist threats and keep people safe,” Cuomo said. “This order gives our partners in New Jersey and Connecticut greater ability to help patrol and protect our mass transit networks. Together we will continue to remain vigilant, and I urge all travelers to stay alert and safe throughout the holidays.”

The holiday season tends to be a time of heightened alert and risk of terror attacks as hundreds of thousands of commuters travel between New York, New Jersey and Connecticut each day via mass transit systems, including inter-state rail, bus and ferry systems.

Increased manpower and overall law enforcement presence will allow governments throughout the region to protect public safety and provide an additional reassurance to commuters, Cuomo’s press release said.

The order was issued on Dec. 8 and will remain in effect for 30 days.

“Black Diamonds To Tidewater” WebSite Revisited

“Found” an old WebSite that is now “archived”. Not updated since 2005, but that does not matter since the railroads it covers are not around anymore anyway.

It is titled:

Black Diamonds to Tidewater

The Old Company’s Lehigh and Central Railroad of New Jersey in the Anthracite Region

If you like the subject, see

Holiday Trains in Action.

The Canadian Pacific Holiday Train came down from  Rouses Point to Kenwood (Albany).  Saturday with shows at Mechanicville and Saratoga. Read more about this train.

ALL ABOARD THE STEAMTOWN HOLIDAY EXPRESS

As the holiday express train rolls into the historic Steamtown site in
Scranton. Carolers and elves are at the ready to help kick off the holiday season for hundreds of people. Read More

Steamtown Holiday Express
Steamtown Holiday Express

 

New York State DOT plots new Amtrak station in Schenectady

The New York State Department of Transportation (NYSDOT) late last week announced plans to build a new Amtrak station in Schenectady, N.Y., to connect travelers to New York City, Niagara Falls and other destinations.

Construction is expected to begin this spring as crews place a new second track between Albany and Schenectady, NYSDOT officials said in a news release.

The double track is aimed at minimizing delays between the two cities and enhancing service all along Amtrak’s Empire Corridor.

Station construction is expected to wrap up in early 2018, NYSDOT officials said.

“A new train station in downtown Schenectady will help further the city’s resurgence and support local revitalization efforts,” said NYSDOT Commissioner Matthew Driscoll.

NYSDOT also issued a pre-bid notice containing contract details for prospective project contractors. Bidding details, including project plans and specifications, will be available in December.

Bid proposals are due in January.

The design of the new Schenectady Station is inspired by the aesthetics and architecture of the city’s former Union Station, which was built on the same site in 1910, NYSDOT officials said. Amtrak will own the new station, which will be slightly larger than the current one.

Additionally, the new station will feature improved accessibility for people with disabilities, a new platform and rehabilitated concourse access, a new elevator, and improved pedestrian and bicycle access.

New York State has competed for and won several grants from the Federal Railroad Administration to make improvements to the Empire Corridor, including the construction of the new Schenectady station.

The Hudson River and the Hudson River Railroad—1851

We welcome stories on the Hudson River and the Hudson River Railroad (later New York Central Railroad).

So we ran into a fantastic article on the Catskill Archive

The Hudson Riverand theHudson River Railroad—1851Published by Bradbury and Guild

The Hudson rises in a marshy tract in Essex county, east of Long Lake. Its head waters are nearly four thousand feet above the level of the sea. After receiving the waters of the Scroon on the north, and the Sacondaga, which flows from Hamilton county, on the west, it turns eastward until it reaches the meridian of Lake Champlain, where it suddenly sweeps round to the southward, and continues in a direct course to New York. One mile above Troy it receives the Mohawk River on the west, the latter being the largest stream of the two at their junction.

The entire length of the Hudson is three hundred and twenty-five miles. The picturesque beauty of its banks,—forming gentle grassy slopes, or covered with forests to the water’s edge, or crowned by neat and thriving towns, now overshadowing the water with tall cliffs, and now rising in mural precipices,—and the legendary and historical interests associated with numerous spots, combine to render the Hudson the classic stream of the United States.

The picture at the top is the Albany Night Boat.

Troy was a railroad center and had a Union Railroad that tied them all together.

Hudson River is named after Henry Hudson, by whom it was discovered in 1609.

THE ENTIRE LENGTH of the Hudson River Railroad, from Chamber street to Albany, is one hundred and forty-three miles and a quarter.

The principal object of interest at Sing Sing is the State Prison. It is situated upon the bank of the Hudson River, ten feet above high water mark. The railroad runs directly through the prison yard. The prison grounds comprise one hundred and thirty acres, and may be approached by vessels drawing twelve feet of water. The keeper’s house, workshop, &c., are built of rough “Sing Sing marble,” quarried from lands owned by the state in the vicinity. The main building is four hundred and eighty-four feet in length, running parallel with the river, and forty-four feet in width. It is five stories high, with two hundred cells upon each floor; in all, one thousand cells.

West Point, fifty-one miles from New York, is unquestionably the most romantic place upon the Hudson River. The approach to it is highly interesting. The village is placed upon the top of a promontory one hundred and eighty-eight feet above the river, where there is spread out a level plateau or terrace, more than a mile in circumference. The declivity is very steep on all sides, and the surrounding craggy hills seem to be nothing but masses of rocks, fantastically heaped by nature, crowding the stream below into a channel less than half a mile in width.

West Point is chiefly noted as the seat of the Military Academy, established here in 1802. The land—about two hundred and fifty acres—was ceded to the United States by New York in 1826. The buildings are two stone barracks occupied by two hundred and fifty cadets, the limited number; a large stone building, for military exercises in the winter, and as a depository for models of fortifications, &c.; a two-story stone building, with three towers, for astronomical purposes; a chapel, hospital, mess-rooms, &c., &c., and a number of other dwelling-houses for the officers of the institution.

Albany city, the capital of New York, is directly opposite Greenbush, with which there is constant communication by means of a ferry. The city is built upon a flat alluvial tract of land, along the margin of the river, from 15 to 100 rods wide, back of which it rises abruptly, attaining, within the space of half a mile, an elevation of 153 feet, and in one mile 220 feet above the river. Beyond this the surface is level. The older portions of the city are laid out very irregularly, and some of them are very narrow. The streets recently built are more spacious and regular. State street is from 150 to 170 feet wide, and has a steep ascent to the top of the hill. Many of the private, and more especially the public, buildings of Albany have fine situations, and overlook an extensive and a beautiful prospect.

The Capitol, which stands at the head of State street, on the hill, is a large stone edifice, 115 feet long, and 90 feet broad, fronting east, on a fine square. It contains spacious and richly furnished apartments for the accommodation of the Senate and Assembly, and various rooms for other public purposes. From the observatory at the top, which is accessible to visitors, a fine view of the city and surrounding country is obtained. The City Hall is on the east side of the same square, facing west, and is constructed with marble, with a gilded dome. The Albany Academy, built of freestone, adjoining the square, has a park in front of it; and both squares are surrounded by an iron fence, and constitute a large and beautiful public ground, laid out with walks, and ornamented with trees. The Exchange, at the foot of State street, is a commodious building of granite, constructed a few years since. The Post-office is in this building. It has also an extensive reading-room, supplied with papers and periodicals, both American and foreign, to which strangers are admitted without charge.

Albany Troy Belt Line

PenneyVanderbilt

Image

Picture above was the Maiden Lane Bridge in Albany, NY. It plays a part in a recent discussion on the “Belt Line” that provided frequent train service. After a lot of guessing, we finally got the straight scoop from Gordon Davids:

The Albany – Troy Belt Line was jointly operated by the New York Central and the Delaware and Hudson. Contrary to a statement made on another web site and widely quoted, it was not initiated in response to competition from electric
railroads. The service was begun around 1881, according to the 1916 Annual Report of the New York State Public Service Commission.

It appears from that 1916 report that both railroads had reduced the frequency of service in that year, and the Public Service Commission took some exception to that action.

The Belt trains operated in a loop, using the upper level of Albany Union Station, Maiden Lane Bridge…

View original post 736 more words