Category Archives: Fairpromise

America’s 10 Best Cities to Live and Launch a Business In

A great place to live can also be a great place to start a business.

The financial blog 24/7 Wall St. recently ranked the 50 best cities to live. They used Census Bureau data for 550 cities, including statistics on employment growth, educational attainment and housing affordability to determine which cities are at the top of the heap.

Check out the original article for pictures. Here are the top 10 cities to live (and also start a business):

10. Johns Creek, Georgia

Median income: $100,478
2013 Unemployment rate: 6.50%
Median home value: $337,900
Average commute: 30.3 minutes

9. Flower Mound, Texas

Median income: $113,683
2013 Unemployment rate: 2013: 5.30%
Median home value: $277,900
Average commute: 25.9 minutes

8. Cary, North Carolina

Median income: $86,151
2013 Unemployment rate: 4.80%
Median home value: $298,200
Average commute: 22.1 minutes

7. Troy, Michigan

Median income: $81,800
2013 Unemployment rate: 7.00%
Median home value: $203,940000
Average commute: 23.5 minutes

6. Irvine, California

Median income: $96,278
2013 Unemployment rate: 4.70%
Median home value: $630,400
Average commute: 25.9 minutes

5. Evanston, Illinois

Median income: $68,169
2013 Unemployment rate: 7.20%
Median home value: $360,900
Average commute: 28.4 minutes

4. Pleasanton, California

Median income: :$112,665
2013 Unemployment rate: 3.70%
Median home value: $694,300
Average commute: 28.9 minutes

3. Mountain View, California

Median income: $91,422
2013 Unemployment rate: 5.00%
Median home value: $749,000
Average commute: 20.46 minutes

2. Bellevue, Washington

Median income: $91,449
2013 Unemployment rate: 4.70%
Median home value: $507,600
Average commute: 22.6 minutes

1. Newton, Massachusetts

Median household income: $125,642
2013 Unemployment rate: 4.80%
Median home value: $689,900
Average commute: 26.4 minutes

OK Now, Why Did We Write This Article and Why is St Joseph, Michigan the Feature Image at the Top?

FAIRPROMESS is a new startup business. While our World  Headquarters is in Nice, France; our United States operation will be headquartered in St Joseph.

Median income: $49,982
2013 Unemployment rate: 10.5%
Median home value: $175,000
Average commute: 17 minutes

Lighthouses in St Joseph, Michigan
Lighthouses in St Joseph, Michigan

Main Street in St Joseph
Main Street in St Joseph

Welcome to the Riviera of the Midwest

St. Joseph is carefully nestled on the southern tip of what has been termed “The Riviera of the Midwest.” This deepwater port town is a growing resort community – part of a “small town” chain stretching from the state line in a spectacular arc along Lake Michigan. The lakeshore is peppered with remarkable sand dune formations and lined further inland with a lush countryside that produces some of the nation’s finest orchards and vineyards. It is the largest non-citrus fruit growing region in the nation.

Located just 90 miles from downtown Chicago, St. Joseph is a quaint community situated within the larger Benton Harbor/St. Joseph MSA. The City of St. Joseph has continually operated at full economic capacity.

St. Joseph is the county seat for Berrien County, a distinction maintained since 1894. St. Joseph has prospered over the years by encouraging a balanced mix of industrial, commercial, and residential development.

St. Joseph has become well known for its beautiful location along Lake Michigan, its quality public school system, its health care system, its beaches, parks, and other natural amenities, and its affluent community. The presence of many large corporations causes the city’s population to triple during the average workday. St. Joseph has become the ideal location for many second-home buyers, with a strong attraction from the Chicago area.

Tourists come to St. Joseph every year by the tens of thousands to enjoy the beaches, Lake Michigan, the St. Joseph River, downtown shopping, festivals and more. Silver Beach County Park in downtown St. Joseph attracts hundreds of thousands of visitors annually, and the number of visitors continues to grow. Annual festivals in St. Joseph continue to draw increasing numbers of tourists to the community.

Sea Gull Harbor in St Joseph Michigan
Sea Gull Harbor in St Joseph Michigan

WHAT IS FAIRPROMISE?

Fairpromise is the next generation social network based on the people’s social commitment, aiming to become a top 3 social network and a complement for Facebook and Twitter. Fairpromise is an action engine which transforms promises (ideas, dreams, concepts) into actions. Fairpromise reduces the gap between people’s expectancies and reality and offers them a platform for accomplishments and achievements of realistic goals providing innovative project and risk management tools made extremely simple to improve their daily activities (users from 5 to 100 years old targeted differently according to their age, location).

Fairpromise is a free site promoting in a playful way justice, responsibility, fair play and educational values. Fairpromise is a personal, professional, political and social barometer.

Watch a video about Fairpromise

Lake Michigan Sunset
Lake Michigan Sunset

 

 

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You Are Going To Be Seeing A lot Of This Already-Famous Picture

Fairpromise found a really great picture to show off the dramatic impact of Fairpromise, the “Action Engine”

WorldsMostPowerfulSocialEngine03

In 1946, at Harmon, New York; NY Central Railroad Niagara Locomotive 6001 is being pulled by 4 models to show how great Timken roller bearings worked

(Photo clipped from an old New York Central Headlight and filmed by Pathé Newsreel)

Because the picture is 68 years old, we will not get any copyright infringement from the successors to the New York Central: American Premier Underwriters or Andrew Penson

Find out about FEATS and Fairpromise

 

Pope Francis, An Amazing Person

Found a couple of interesting, and different, articles about Pope Francis.

Pope Francis has approval ratings any leader could envy: 88 percent of American Catholics think he’s doing a good job, and nearly three quarters of Americans in general view him with favor. What is he doing right?

To answer that question, business author Jeffrey A. Krames examined His Holiness’s approach from a leadership perspective, and the result is Lead with Humility: 12 Leadership Lessons from Pope FrancisThough a non-Catholic, Krames was inspired to write about the pontiff because he is the child of Holocaust survivors, he explains. “When I saw Pope Francis, I thought he was the anti-Hitler.”

1. Reach out to non-customers.

2. Embrace risk.

3. Reinvent your organization.

4. Be patient.

5. Get in the field.

6. Listen to diverse voices.

7. Put the organization’s goals above your own.

8. Lead by example.

Next is an interview:

Billionaire Ken Langone, the founder of Home Depot issued a warning to  Pope Francis during an  interview with CNBC which was published this past Monday. In the interview he said that wealthy people such as himself are feeling ostracized by the Pope’s messages in support of the poor, and might stop giving to  charity if the Pope continues to make statements criticizing capitalism and income inequality.

Mr. Langone described the Pope’s comments about a “culture of prosperity” as “exclusionary” statements that may make some of the rich “incapable of feeling compassion for the poor.”

 The billionaire, who’s a major donor to the  Republican Party, is currently working with Cardinal Timothy Dolan, the Archbishop of New York, to raise $180 million for the restoration of St. Patrick’s Cathedral. Langone said that he told the Archbishop about a wealthy donor who could give millions of dollars to the Cathedral project but was worried about the Pope’s “exclusionary” remarks.

“I’ve told the cardinal, ‘Your Eminence, this is one more hurdle I hope we don’t have to deal with. You want to be careful about generalities. Rich people in one country don’t act the same as rich people in another country,'” said Langone.

“The pope loves poor people. He also loves rich people. So I said, ‘Ken, thanks for bringing it to my attention. We’ve gotta correct, to make sure this gentleman understands the Holy Father’s message properly.’ And then I think he’s gonna say, ‘Oh, OK. If that’s the case, count me in for St. Patrick’s Cathedral,’” Dolan said.

During a speech in Brazil this past July, Pope Francis appealed “to those in possession of greater resources,” saying that they should “never tire of working for a more just world, marked by greater solidarity. No one can remain insensitive to the inequalities that persist in the world.”

Choice Overload

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Penney Vanderbilt recently posted a blog on

Self Help For You “Office-Weary Warriors” Out There

Well we found something similar you might enjoy:

In the Western world, we pride ourselves on our right to choose. From voting for political leaders to purchasing an automobile, we have a say in just about every decision in our lives. The average grocery store displays 45,000 items for our shopping pleasure, while a typical big box store has about 100,000. There are over 27 million books on Amazon and an increasing number of available singles on dating sites.

We thrive on having a number of options available at our fingertips, but does that variety lead us to make the best decisions? The experts say no. Though it may be appealing on the surface, it turns out too much choice can be downright crippling in the end.

Back when Columbia University professor Sheena Iyengar was a graduate student, she undertook an interesting experiment about choice. With the cooperation of a high-end grocery store – the kind that has 75 different kinds of olive oil – she set out to determine whether having more options available makes a customer buy more or less of a product.

She set up two tasting booths, one with 24 flavors of jam, the other with six flavors. While the table with more options attracted more samplers, the conversion rate was lousy – only two out of every 100 people ended up purchasing jam. Compare that with the 12 people who tossed a jar into their cart after stopping at the table with just six flavors. The results said it all: those faced with fewer choices were six times more likely to make an actual purchase.

It’s not the only study to draw such conclusions. In another instance, Iyengar and a handful of peers analyzed retirement savings choices made by 500,000 employees and found the more investment funds available, the lower the employee participation. People were opting out – and missing out on free money from their employer – simply because they were overwhelmed by choice.

Iyengar has identified three main negative consequences to what she calls our “choice overload problem.” First, we’re likely to procrastinate and put off making a decision as long as possible. When we do finally make one, it’s probably not the best choice. Finally, we experience a sense of dissatisfaction with our decision, forever wondering if we could have found something better. Instead of being liberated by choice, we are suffocated by it. The whole process can be absolutely unpleasant.

Business leaders often have to make tough decisions under a great deal of pressure. The average CEO makes almost 140 decisions in a week, nearly half of which are made in nine minutes or less. The good news is we can fine-tune our process to ensure the choices we make are appropriate and without regret.

Iyengar suggests adopting the following four tried-and-tested techniques to make better decisions in business and life:

1. Cut. By reducing redundancies and limiting choice, many brands – from Proctor & Gamble to Campbell’s – have witnessed costs plummet and sales increase. On the consumer side, it’s easy to be bombarded with too much information when researching a potential purchase. Some experts suggest shoppers limit themselves to reading three websites when looking up product information online. Remember, less is more.

In the Western world, we pride ourselves on our right to choose. From voting for political leaders to purchasing an automobile, we have a say in just about every decision in our lives. The average grocery store displays 45,000 items for our shopping pleasure, while a typical big box store has about 100,000. There are over 27 million books on Amazon and an increasing number of available singles on dating sites.

We thrive on having a number of options available at our fingertips, but does that variety lead us to make the best decisions? The experts say no. Though it may be appealing on the surface, it turns out too much choice can be downright crippling in the end.

Back when Columbia University professor Sheena Iyengar was a graduate student, she undertook an interesting experiment about choice. With the cooperation of a high-end grocery store – the kind that has 75 different kinds of olive oil – she set out to determine whether having more options available makes a customer buy more or less of a product.

She set up two tasting booths, one with 24 flavors of jam, the other with six flavors. While the table with more options attracted more samplers, the conversion rate was lousy – only two out of every 100 people ended up purchasing jam. Compare that with the 12 people who tossed a jar into their cart after stopping at the table with just six flavors. The results said it all: those faced with fewer choices were six times more likely to make an actual purchase.

It’s not the only study to draw such conclusions. In another instance, Iyengar and a handful of peers analyzed retirement savings choices made by 500,000 employees and found the more investment funds available, the lower the employee participation. People were opting out – and missing out on free money from their employer – simply because they were overwhelmed by choice.

Iyengar has identified three main negative consequences to what she calls our “choice overload problem.” First, we’re likely to procrastinate and put off making a decision as long as possible. When we do finally make one, it’s probably not the best choice. Finally, we experience a sense of dissatisfaction with our decision, forever wondering if we could have found something better. Instead of being liberated by choice, we are suffocated by it. The whole process can be absolutely unpleasant.

Business leaders often have to make tough decisions under a great deal of pressure. The average CEO makes almost 140 decisions in a week, nearly half of which are made in nine minutes or less. The good news is we can fine-tune our process to ensure the choices we make are appropriate and without regret.

Iyengar suggests adopting the following four tried-and-tested techniques to make better decisions in business and life:

1. Cut. By reducing redundancies and limiting choice, many brands – from Proctor & Gamble to Campbell’s – have witnessed costs plummet and sales increase. On the consumer side, it’s easy to be bombarded with too much information when researching a potential purchase. Some experts suggest shoppers limit themselves to reading three websites when looking up product information online. Remember, less is more.

2. Concretization. Visualizing the outcome of a situation can be a powerful tool when making decisions. Iyengar found more people sign up for 401(k) plans when asked to consider the positive outcomes of saving more money. It’s been proven people spend less when carrying cash as opposed to using a debit card. Making something feel real can change the choices we make.

3. Categorization. If the “chooser” does a good job of categorizing the options, it makes it easier for the person making the choice. Our brains are able to process more information if properly sorted into logical categories, which is something to consider when ironing out your own decision-making process or marketing your product or service.

4. Complexity. When faced with a number of complex choices, research shows people are able to make better decisions when they progress from a simple choice to something more complicated. Conditioning yourself and your customers for complexity can increase engagement and produce big results.

Chances are the amount of options available to us won’t decline anytime soon, but by taking a disciplined, thoughtful approach to the decisions we make, we are better able to manage our choices. We may even enjoy it more, too.

BETTER LIFE FOR YOU: FAIRPROMISE

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Definition of Better Life

of superior quality or excellence: a better coat; a better speech.
morally superior; more virtuous: They are no better than thieves.
of superior suitability, advisability, desirability, acceptableness, etc.; preferable: a better time for action.
larger; greater: the better part of a lifetime.
improved in health; healthier than before.

 

Synonyms of Better Life

advance, promote; reform, correct, rectify

 

Well, there are all kinds of Better Life:

Let’s focus on a great place to find Freedom: Fairpromise

WHAT IS FAIRPROMISE?

Fairpromise is the next generation social network based on the people’s social commitment, aiming to become a top 3 social network and a complement for Facebook and Twitter. Fairpromise is an action engine which transforms promises (ideas, dreams, concepts) into actions. Fairpromise reduces the gap between people’s expectancies and reality and offers them a platform for accomplishments and achievements of realistic goals providing innovative project and risk management tools made extremely simple to improve their daily activities (users from 5 to 100 years old targeted differently according to their age, location).

Fairpromise is a free site promoting in a playful way justice, responsibility, fair play and educational values. Fairpromise is a personal, professional, political and social barometer.

Watch a video about Fairpromise

Liberty FOR YOU: FAIRPROMISE

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Statue of Liberty replica in Nice, France

 

 

Definition of Liberty

The quality or state of being free:

a : the power to do as one pleases

b : freedom from physical restraint

c : freedom from arbitrary or despotic control

d : the positive enjoyment of various social, political, or economic rights and privileges

e : the power of choice

 

Synonyms of Liberty

Right, franchise, autonomy, priviledge, authorization, independence, suffrage, free speech

 

Well, there are all kinds of Liberty:

Let’s focus on a great place to find Liberty: Fairpromise

WHAT IS FAIRPROMISE?

Fairpromise is the next generation social network based on the people’s social commitment, aiming to become a top 3 social network and a complement for Facebook and Twitter. Fairpromise is an action engine which transforms promises (ideas, dreams, concepts) into actions. Fairpromise reduces the gap between people’s expectancies and reality and offers them a platform for accomplishments and achievements of realistic goals providing innovative project and risk management tools made extremely simple to improve their daily activities (users from 5 to 100 years old targeted differently according to their age, location).

Fairpromise is a free site promoting in a playful way justice, responsibility, fair play and educational values. Fairpromise is a personal, professional, political and social barometer.

Watch a video about Fairpromise

With a potential to reach 1 million users in 60 to 70 cycles and a viral behavior based on a highly emotional message, Fairpromise can become source for many web services and online and offline rich media format applications and games.

Introducing ethics in business, personal and political life Fairpromise encourages real life events and online activities and establishes the first (expected) bridge between reality and the virtual world.

Fairpromise measures the impact of a promise or a challenge (same thing, different approach) on a selected audience, through the universal concept of the promise and challenge. Fairpromise uses the credit for monetization and interaction between users and to keep it funny.

The promise/challenge is presented in a written, audio or video format, making it attractive to an evolving media and suitable for sharing and integration on any platform (Facebook, YouTube, etc.).

Fairpromise offers a unique opportunity to transform credit in money through the CreditradeTM, a tool which allows users to buy credit (coins) from each other using the Fairpromise platform.

Ordinary people come to Fairpromise for fun or for money, for custom education programs for their children or students or to reach achievable goals in their daily tasks.

Public people and VIPs come on Fairpromise to increase their visibility making promises and challenging each other and measure their popularity.

Business people come to create and manage actions (projects, contracts, events, etc) and to negotiate win-win situations, create challenges to increase personal or company’s image, create contests to increase sales or to post projects to increase productivity with the innovative management system that allows anyone to deploy very complex projects in a simple way using the web platform or the mobile phone.

Companies are interested to present new product features, events (offers, deals, sales, etc.). Fairpromise lets users to manage groups. Supplementary features for group’s dynamic allow users to syndicate and to implement different strategies using the group’s power.

Fairpromise is multilingual allowing an international exposure and interaction. Fairpromise economical model is based on several independent, verified templates:

 

1. User addiction: promise more, earn more credits: FP assesses the credit transaction between users;

2. Ticket system: Online and/or offline help to model contracts, projects or other promises.

3. Fun (Strategy layer for advanced users): Allows users to create strategies, define groups etc.

4. Incentives and Gifts: Diplomas, Mugs, T-shirts or stuffed animals, toys (choice offered for rewards at the end of a promise, targeting 15-25 years) standard/customized models available;

5. Advertising: Advertising solutions on several supports (web, mobile technology) based on PPC, MPC, PPA, and pay per plan, (advertising objects & pay per click).