Category Archives: Awesomness

BRIGHTLINE’S Second Train Arrives, Limited Service To Start In July

Brightline this week heralded a milestone — arrival of its second train — and at the same time announced an apparent setback: When passenger service commences in July it will be even more limited than previously announced.

Instead of carryingpassengers between West Palm Beach and MiamiCentral, a sprawling downtown-Miami rail station with commercial, retail and residential space, Brightline in late July will begin service only between Fort Lauderdale and West Palm Beach.

Service is to expand to Miami in late August, when work on MiamiCentral is complete, according to Brightline. Stations in West Palm Beach and Fort Lauderdale are “nearing completion,” Brightline said in a news release.

The project’s second phase, full service to Orlando, is at least several years away, with service commencing in 2019 at the earliest, the company estimated in January.  On Monday, Brightline said it is “currently finalizing permitting and will have a better idea of timing to Orlando after operations begin this summer.”

The project has faced opposition from Treasure Coast residents who say the railroad would endanger the public and the environment. It is facing lawsuits by Martin and Indian River counties.

Meanwhile, BrightPink, Brightline’s second completed passenger train, on Monday afternoon rolled through the Treasure Coast on the final leg of its trip from California to the railroad’s maintenance facility in West Palm Beach.

The four-car, two-locomotive train — named for its vivid hue — passed through Vero Beach at 3:45 p.m. and Stuart at 4:25 p.m. The passenger railroad’s first train, BrightBlue, was delivered Dec. 14, but rolled through the region in the early-morning hours.

BrightPink and BrightBlue are the first in Brightline’s five-train fleet that will run along the Florida East Coast Railway tracks, eventually between Miami and Orlando.

BrightRed, BrightOrange and BrightGreen are to be delivered from manufacturer Siemens’ Sacramento plant every six weeks, with all five trains assembled in West Palm Beach by early July, according to Michael Cahill, president, Rail Systems Division.

Brightline said it will hold a grand opening and official launch of the railroad in September.

Bernie Sanders Has Already Won

A British general once said to Gandhi, “You don’t think we’re just going to walk out of India!”

Gandhi replied, “Yes. In the end, you will walk out. Because 100,000 Englishmen simply cannot control 350 million Indians, if those Indians refuse to cooperate.”

he progressive political battle was never for the White House. It was, is, and always has been for mobilization. The battle against plutocracy and fascism has always, in reality, been a battle against apathy.

Bernie Sanders, with this remarkable campaign, has taken the issue of American political corruption out of the shadows and placed it center stage.

While that sounds like a simple thing, it is a thing that all progressive leaders have tried and failed to do for as long as there has been an American political process. The movement is mobilized, and not a moment too soon.

Winning the Presidency

The Oval Office would more aptly at this point be called The Office of the Empire Manager. The notion that any work of social good can be achieved from the Oval Office is, at this juncture, sadly far-fetched at best.

From that perspective, Hillary Clinton is actually well suited for the office, if you want your empire managed efficiently. If you want the logic of empire challenged at its core, then you’ll appreciate the scope of Bernie Sanders’ achievement.

So will Bernie win the “battle” to be the democratic nominee for president? In truth, it seems like a long shot. Will he win the “war” against apathy? He already has, in extraordinary fashion.

What makes defeating apathy so important? Apathy is where corruption grows. Apathy is so valuable to the corrupt that they manufacture it and control the production of it. This is where infotainment and mass broadcasting play such an important role. The trick is to keep the population huddled beneath their security blankets, rather than pounding on doors and demanding justice.

The people who understand the magnitude of the transgressions and who want change have always been there. But they have always been relegated to three percent of the popular vote in presidential campaigning. Brave new world. We are united, we have numbers, and we are on the march. It’s not about the Oval Office, it’s about the country, our country. Let’s win there.

Marc Ash, Reader Supported News

Paris to Rome in one hour: France backs the Hyperloop

PenneyVanderbilt

Photo: Hyperloop Transport Technologies

Imagine Paris to Marseille in just 40 minutes, or Paris to Rome in just over one hour. French rail chiefs believe it’s not just a pie in the sky idea.

Hyperloop One startup, intent on zipping people along at near-supersonic speeds in pressurized tubes, announced Tuesday that the French national rail company had joined its growing list of backers.

Hyperloop One said that it raised $80 million in fresh funding from an array of investors, including GE Ventures and France’s SNCF.

“The overwhelming response we’ve had already confirms what we’ve always known, that Hyperloop One is at the forefront of a movement to solve one of the planet’s most pressing problems,” Hyperloop One co-founder Shervin Pishevar said.

“The brightest minds are coming together at the right time to eliminate the distances and borders that separate economies and cultures.”

While the idea of the Hyperloop replacing France’s already high-speed TGV services might seem a little…

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New BART rail car crashes at testing facility

During a trial run at Bay Area Rapid Transit‘s (BART) testing facility last week, one of the agency’s new “Fleet of the Future” rail cars crashed into a sand box after a brake problem.

One of BART’s new ‘Fleet of the Future’ rail cars.
Photo: BART’s YouTube account

A wire running from testing equipment to the car shorted out when it was pinched in a cabinet door, causing the car’s auxiliary power supply to shut down, BART officials said Wednesday.

As a result, once the fluid in the accumulator had been expended it couldn’t be replenished, which meant that the friction brakes didn’t have enough fluid to completely stop the car.

That type of failure can only occur with a single car because other cars in a train would normally carry through the braking process, BART officials said.

The crash occurred as the car was moving under 5 mph.

There was no malfunction of the train or operator error during the April 22 incident, agency officials said. The crash won’t affect the rollout of BART’s new rail cars, some of which are slated to enter service in fall.

“The car functioned exactly as it was supposed to function given the conditions, and the operators did exactly what they were supposed to do,” said BART chief Maintenance and Engineering Officer Tamar Allen.

Comparing the Big Dig’s costs to mega projects around the world

Tunnels, highways, and rail lines cost billions no matter where you build them.

Facts and figures are based on an article in the BOSTON GLOBE.

The price tag for Boston’s Big Dig ballooned from $2.6 billion to nearly $15 billion. And it was eight years behind schedule by the time it was done. How does that compare with some other mega construction projects around the world?

Gotthard Base Tunnel, Switzerland

Alaskan Way Viaduct, Seattle

  • Cost: $3.1 billion. Earthquake-damaged highway to be replaced by a tunnel. Under construction.

D.C. Metro Silver Line extension

  • Cost: $7 billion. New 23-mile rail line to Dulles International Airport. Under construction.

London’s Crossrail

Second Avenue subway, New York City

The Chunnel, English Channel

  • Cost: $21 billion. A 31-mile rail tunnel connecting England and France. Completed in 1994.

 

“Black Diamonds To Tidewater” WebSite Revisited

“Found” an old WebSite that is now “archived”. Not updated since 2005, but that does not matter since the railroads it covers are not around anymore anyway.

It is titled:

Black Diamonds to Tidewater

The Old Company’s Lehigh and Central Railroad of New Jersey in the Anthracite Region

If you like the subject, see

The way you think about adversity affects your ability to persevere.

While it’s often easy to be mentally strong when life is going well, your true strength becomes apparent through adversity. The loss of a loved one, a health problem, relationship issues, and financial troubles are just a few of the hardships most people face at one time or another.

The way you think about life’s inevitable obstacles affects your ability to cope with tough times. Developing a productive inner dialogue is one of the most productive ways mentally strong people keep building their mental muscle. Repeating positive, yet realistic affirmations can drown out the negative thoughts that can hold you back.

Here are nine things to remember when you’re going through tough times.

1. I have what I need to get through this.

Thinking things like “I can’t do this” or “This isn’t fair” will cause you to feel defeated. Rather than insist you need more, remember what you already have. If you’ve made it this far in life, you clearly have some skills, tools, and resources already in place.

2. Living according to my values is what really matters.

There are going to be people who won’t like you and times when people will disagree with the decisions you make. But your job isn’t to please everyone. Be brave enough to live according to your values, even when that means making unpopular decisions.

3. Failure is part of the road to success.

Failure isn’t fun, but beating yourself up over it won’t help. Each time you fall down, it serves as proof you’re pushing yourself to new limits. Remember that each failure is an opportunity to grow stronger and become better.

4. All I can do is my best.

Demanding perfection from yourself will do more harm than good. Whether you’re interviewing for a job that you really need, or you’ve got one last shot to try for that promotion, insisting there’s no room for error will skyrocket your anxiety. A little self-compassion will help you perform at your peak.

5. Five years from now this won’t matter as much as I think it will.

Keep temporary problems in perspective by reminding yourself that the emotional pain, anxiety, or turmoil won’t last forever. Many of today’s crucial decisions and major worries won’t actually matter that much a few years down the road.

6. I’m stronger than I think.

A serious health problem or the loss of a loved one can be very difficult to handle. But catastrophic predictions like “I’ll never recover from this” or “I won’t ever be happy again” will only drag you down. Adversity often reveals hidden inner strength you never knew you had.

7. I can handle feeling uncomfortable.

It can be tempting to stay inside your comfort zone, but getting through tough times often requires you to do something different. Although emotions like fear, embarrassment, and disappointment are uncomfortable, they won’t kill you. Be willing to face those emotions head on and you’ll gain confidence in your ability to cope with discomfort.

8. I am in control of how I think, feel, and behave.

Blaming other people for what’s going on in your life won’t help your situation. Acknowledging that you’re in control of how you think, feel, and behave can empower you to either make the best of your circumstances, or create positive changes in your life.

9. I’ve been knocked down before and I can get back up again.

Look back at the times you’ve persevered before. Recalling your fortitude in dealing with past struggles can help you summon the strength to deal with current problems.

Giving yourself positive affirmations alone won’t necessarily change your life–the way you think is only one of the three core factors of mental strength. But healthy self-talk will help you feel better and inspire you to behave more productively, which is key to getting through tough times.

By Amy Morin

Author, “13 Things Mentally Strong People Don’t Do”

With help from Penney Vanderbilt