Category Archives: Albany

Utica Comets Sweep Weekend Over Albany Devils

Just 24 hours after claiming the franchise’s first regulation victory over the Albany Devils, the Utica Comets did it again by the score of 3-1 Saturday evening at the Utica Memorial Auditorium. The win improves the Comets record to 9-11-1-0 on the season.

Carter Bancks (2-0-2), and Darren Archibald (1-0-1) collected the Comets three tallies, while Thatcher Demko picked up the victory with a 29-save performance.

The team’s battled to a scoreless through the first period, and half of the second, until Archibald struck for the seventh time this season. While playing a man down, Archibald beat a Devils defender to a cleared puck, and chipped it over Blackwood as he was being dragged down from behind. The unassisted short-handed goal staked the Comets to a 1-0 lead.

Seven minutes later the Devils added a short-handed goal of their own when Blake Coleman slipped the puck past Demko for his fifth of the season.

The team’s traded chanced until Carter Bancks broke through twice on the power play late in the third period.

The first goal, his fourth of the season, came as the result of a beautiful redirection off Pascal Pelletier’s perfect cross-slot pass. The assist for Pelletier was his first point since rejoining the Comets.

A little over a minute later, again on the power play, Bancks scooped up a rebound off a Cody Kunyk blast, and shot it into the back of the net. Colby Robak recorded the secondary assist on the insurance goal.

The Comets power play went 2-for-10 on the night, while the penalty kill turned their third consecutive perfect effort and allowed no goals in seven attempts.

The Utica Comets wrap up their brief two-game home stand with a match-up against the Toronto Marlies Wednesday evening at The AUD.Puck drop is scheduled for 7 p.m.

 

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The Hudson River and the Hudson River Railroad—1851

We welcome stories on the Hudson River and the Hudson River Railroad (later New York Central Railroad).

So we ran into a fantastic article on the Catskill Archive

The Hudson Riverand theHudson River Railroad—1851Published by Bradbury and Guild

The Hudson rises in a marshy tract in Essex county, east of Long Lake. Its head waters are nearly four thousand feet above the level of the sea. After receiving the waters of the Scroon on the north, and the Sacondaga, which flows from Hamilton county, on the west, it turns eastward until it reaches the meridian of Lake Champlain, where it suddenly sweeps round to the southward, and continues in a direct course to New York. One mile above Troy it receives the Mohawk River on the west, the latter being the largest stream of the two at their junction.

The entire length of the Hudson is three hundred and twenty-five miles. The picturesque beauty of its banks,—forming gentle grassy slopes, or covered with forests to the water’s edge, or crowned by neat and thriving towns, now overshadowing the water with tall cliffs, and now rising in mural precipices,—and the legendary and historical interests associated with numerous spots, combine to render the Hudson the classic stream of the United States.

The picture at the top is the Albany Night Boat.

Troy was a railroad center and had a Union Railroad that tied them all together.

Hudson River is named after Henry Hudson, by whom it was discovered in 1609.

THE ENTIRE LENGTH of the Hudson River Railroad, from Chamber street to Albany, is one hundred and forty-three miles and a quarter.

The principal object of interest at Sing Sing is the State Prison. It is situated upon the bank of the Hudson River, ten feet above high water mark. The railroad runs directly through the prison yard. The prison grounds comprise one hundred and thirty acres, and may be approached by vessels drawing twelve feet of water. The keeper’s house, workshop, &c., are built of rough “Sing Sing marble,” quarried from lands owned by the state in the vicinity. The main building is four hundred and eighty-four feet in length, running parallel with the river, and forty-four feet in width. It is five stories high, with two hundred cells upon each floor; in all, one thousand cells.

West Point, fifty-one miles from New York, is unquestionably the most romantic place upon the Hudson River. The approach to it is highly interesting. The village is placed upon the top of a promontory one hundred and eighty-eight feet above the river, where there is spread out a level plateau or terrace, more than a mile in circumference. The declivity is very steep on all sides, and the surrounding craggy hills seem to be nothing but masses of rocks, fantastically heaped by nature, crowding the stream below into a channel less than half a mile in width.

West Point is chiefly noted as the seat of the Military Academy, established here in 1802. The land—about two hundred and fifty acres—was ceded to the United States by New York in 1826. The buildings are two stone barracks occupied by two hundred and fifty cadets, the limited number; a large stone building, for military exercises in the winter, and as a depository for models of fortifications, &c.; a two-story stone building, with three towers, for astronomical purposes; a chapel, hospital, mess-rooms, &c., &c., and a number of other dwelling-houses for the officers of the institution.

Albany city, the capital of New York, is directly opposite Greenbush, with which there is constant communication by means of a ferry. The city is built upon a flat alluvial tract of land, along the margin of the river, from 15 to 100 rods wide, back of which it rises abruptly, attaining, within the space of half a mile, an elevation of 153 feet, and in one mile 220 feet above the river. Beyond this the surface is level. The older portions of the city are laid out very irregularly, and some of them are very narrow. The streets recently built are more spacious and regular. State street is from 150 to 170 feet wide, and has a steep ascent to the top of the hill. Many of the private, and more especially the public, buildings of Albany have fine situations, and overlook an extensive and a beautiful prospect.

The Capitol, which stands at the head of State street, on the hill, is a large stone edifice, 115 feet long, and 90 feet broad, fronting east, on a fine square. It contains spacious and richly furnished apartments for the accommodation of the Senate and Assembly, and various rooms for other public purposes. From the observatory at the top, which is accessible to visitors, a fine view of the city and surrounding country is obtained. The City Hall is on the east side of the same square, facing west, and is constructed with marble, with a gilded dome. The Albany Academy, built of freestone, adjoining the square, has a park in front of it; and both squares are surrounded by an iron fence, and constitute a large and beautiful public ground, laid out with walks, and ornamented with trees. The Exchange, at the foot of State street, is a commodious building of granite, constructed a few years since. The Post-office is in this building. It has also an extensive reading-room, supplied with papers and periodicals, both American and foreign, to which strangers are admitted without charge.

Abraham Lincoln and New York Railroads

PenneyVanderbilt

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Plaque in honor of President Lincoln at 414 W. 30th Street in NY City

It is at the site of the Hudson River Railroad’s New York City passenger station. Lincoln arrived here February 19, 1861 on his route to be inaugurated in Washington DC as President of the United States. After his assination Lincoln’s body went through here April 25, 1865. The Hudson River Railroad became part of the New York Central & Hudson River Railroad and moved it’s main station to what became Grand Central Terminal. The old Hudson River Railroad line in the city became the West Side Freight Line.

See more about Abraham Lincoln’s trips

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Picture ABOVE is the engine that pulled the Lincoln Funeral Train

Photo courtesy of Wayne Koch

Information on Lincoln’s funeral train, including details on the route, is fully covered in Scott Trostel’s book on the subject, with maps.

See more…

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Albany Troy Belt Line

PenneyVanderbilt

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Picture above was the Maiden Lane Bridge in Albany, NY. It plays a part in a recent discussion on the “Belt Line” that provided frequent train service. After a lot of guessing, we finally got the straight scoop from Gordon Davids:

The Albany – Troy Belt Line was jointly operated by the New York Central and the Delaware and Hudson. Contrary to a statement made on another web site and widely quoted, it was not initiated in response to competition from electric
railroads. The service was begun around 1881, according to the 1916 Annual Report of the New York State Public Service Commission.

It appears from that 1916 report that both railroads had reduced the frequency of service in that year, and the Public Service Commission took some exception to that action.

The Belt trains operated in a loop, using the upper level of Albany Union Station, Maiden Lane Bridge…

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The Backbone of New York State’s High Speed Rail

Yes! New York State has such a great basis for high speed rail: the 4 Track New York Central Railroad that ran from New York City, through Albany  to Buffalo. Postcard at top shows the old main line going through Fonda.

Read more on ideas for high speed rail in New York State.

CNYrailroadnut: West Shore-Oneida Railway Company and Much More About Railroads

We ran into a great (new?)  WebSite all about all the Central New York that we cover. Check out the CNYrailroadnut

We only checked out a small portion of the site, but will be covering more in the future.

We were trying to find out about West Shore Railroad abandonments and found something on a railnet forum that brought us to this new WebSite

Mainline abandonment’s on the West Shore:

Minoa-Canastota (12.9 miles) 1955
Belle Isle – Amboy (3.9 miles) 1955
Byron-Oakfield (10.24 miles) 1963
Chili Jct. – Byron (11.88 miles) 1959
Amboy-Wayneport (59.32 miles) 1959 (small portions near Lyons and Newark abandoned 1982)
Vernon-New York Mills (12.3 miles) 1964
Little Falls-South Ft. Plain (14.5 miles) 1971
Harbor-South Utica (5.6 miles) 1971
Ilion-Little Falls (9.5 miles) 1973
Oneida Castle-Vernon (5.6 miles) Nov. 1, 1977
Ilion-Harbor (9.4 miles) 1982
Canastota-Oneida Castle (5.9 miles) Spring of 1982 or Oct 1982??

Chenango Branch abandonment dates:

Cazenovia-Earlville 1937
Oran-Cazenovia 1944
Manlius-Oran 1948
Fayettville-Manlius 1964
Dewitt-Fayettville 1977
Final abandonment of the Chenango Branch Syracuse-Dewitt 1983

The original files we were trying to see are “More About West Shore Abandonments” and “Richard Palmer’s West Shore Abandonment Lists

 

 

Return of Albany’s “Night Boat”

PenneyVanderbilt

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Picture (undated, from the Library of Congress) shows the “Night Boat” from New York City docked in Albany. Everything is different in the picture except the Livingston Avenue Bridge in the background that still carries AMTRAK between New York City and Chicago.
Up until 1941, The “Night Boat” from New York City to Albany could carry 2,000 passengers. It ended an era in American history of grand boats with staterooms, ballrooms, etc running up and down the Hudson River. Passengers could be young couples on a weekend trip, couples evading detection by spouses, “ladies of the evening”, etc. There was even a Broadway farce in the 1920’s called the “Night Boat“.
But by 1941, everybody was in a hurry. You could make the trip by car, train or even airplane. Saratoga horse racing and gambling was slowing down as more options opened up near NY City. So when…

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