51 Great Similes to Spark Imagination

WordDreams...

I love similes. They say more in 5-10 words than a whole paragraph. They are like spice to a stew, or perfume to an evening out. They evoke images far beyond the range of words.

Simile–the comparison of two unlike things using the word ‘like’ or ‘as’.  As bald as a newborn babe. As blind as a bat. As white as snow.

Wait–no self-respecting writer would use those. Similes are as much about displaying the writer’s facility with her/his craft as communicating. We are challenged to come up with new comparisons no one has heard before. I’ve seen contests on writer’s blogs for similes and most leave me bored, if not disgusted. It’s harder than it looks to create a simile that works. Look at these I found on G+:

  • #1 – Being with him was like sitting through a Twilight Marathon, all sparkles and self-loathing.
  • #2 – She…

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Women and Computers in WWII – Intermission Story (22)

Pacific Paratrooper

Women with the ENIAC computer

Before the invention of electronic computers, “computer” was a job description, not a machine. Both men and women were employed as computers, but women were more prominent in the field. This was a matter of practicality more than equality. Women were hired because there was a large pool of women with training in mathematics, but they could be hired for much less money than men with comparable training. Despite this bias, some women overcame their inferior status and contributed to the invention of the first electronic computers.

In 1942, just after the United States entered World War II, hundreds of women were employed around the country as computers. Their job consisted of using mechanical desk calculators to solve long lists of equations. The results of these calculations were compiled into tables and published for use on the battlefields by gunnery officers. The tables allowed soldiers…

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Ghosts: Something in the House!

Book 'Em, Jan O

From The Telegraph, a first-person account of a haunted house in the Midlands, UK….This rang true to me, it reminded me of haunted houses I’ve visited or lived in…Enjoy!  

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/books/booknews/10415115/Ghost-stories-There-was-something-about-our-new-home….html

For more ghosts, in paperback or kindle e-book, please see:  https://www.amazon.com/Jan-Olandese/e/B071FK9L75

death be not loud coverfleeceabout ghosts

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New Bridge in the Distance, TZB Removal Ensues

Kaleidoscope Eyes

Eastern side of former and new bridges from a third-floor window/© Janie Rosman 2017

Driving west on Benedict Avenue you can see a few of the main span towers as you descend down the hill. It’s a tease until the trees are bare of leaves; their tops are visible.

I took this photo from the third floor day room of mom’s rehab facility one week before the westbound span officially opened. Crews began removing the Tappan Zee Bridge’s landings and abutments last week, which I noticed last week. Today is one month since vision correction in my left eye and two weeks since my right eye’s correction. My distance vision is crystal clear.

However, out of their (and our) line of vision, crews are busy under the bridges:

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Happy October! Time for Halloween costumes, trick-or-treating, vampires, ghouls, goblins and . . . The Box Under The Bed!

Dan Alatorre - AUTHOR

Guest blog post by a co-author ofThe Box Under The Bed,Anne Marie Andrus.


WW Author author Anne Marie Andrus

Hi, I’m Anne Marie and I want to thank Dan for helping me become a published writer!

During this past year, two of my stories have won second place in Dan’s Word Weaver Writing Contest. The October 11th release of my own novel has been planned for a while, and Chapter 2 of that novel is The Crescent from the April Word Weaver Contest.

Talk about a confidence boost when I really needed one!

Word Weaver was the first writing contest I’ve entered, so winning a prize was a “pinch-me” moment!

Even better than winning (or almost), was Dan’s great critique style.

  • He caught things that nobody had ever commented on before.

  • For example, “Why are your characters always squinting? Is there something wrong with their eyes?” Oh my…

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