THE LONGEST RUNNING TV SHOW

SERENDIPITY

For 31 years, there was a series on Channel 7 in Boston. It was my favorite show. I watched it any day I could get home from work in time. It was on several times a day, five days a week. The first performance often aired during the pre-dawn hours, while the final day’s episode might air long after most people had finished dinner and many had gone to bed.

It was “good stuff.” Garry Armstrong was a smart, thorough reporter who cared about Boston and its people. He knew everyone and they knew him. He makes jokes about being trusted … but he was trusted because he had proved he could be. He had sources. He checked with them. He knew when the a story wasn’t “right” and he was cynical about politicians and big money.

Watching Garry kept me informed about events taking place in my neighborhood, the city, and the region…

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Why do people have to leave each other? Neden insanlar birbirlerini bırakmak zorundadırlar? by Yasmin Mogahed

YA BAKİ ENTEL BAKİ

When I was 17 years old, I had a dream. I dreamt that I was sitting inside a masjid and a little girl walked up to ask me a question. She asked me: “Why do people have to leave each other?” The question was a personal one, but it seemed clear to me why the question was chosen for me.
I was one to get attached.

Ever since I was a child, this temperament was clear. While other children in preschool could easily recover once their parents left, I could not. My tears, once set in motion, did not stop easily. As I grew up, I learned to become attached to everything around me. From the time I was in first grade, I needed a best friend. As I got older, any fall-out with a friend shattered me. I couldn’t let go of anything. People, places, events, photographs, moments—even outcomes…

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ICYMI: Classic Car Night draws Crowds, Raises $$

Kaleidoscope Eyes

Maybe you’ll see one of these cars on the new bridge. One never knows, do one?

Despite threat of rain from late July skies, the Nyack Chamber of Commerce’s Sixth Annual Classic Car Night  drew thousands without a hitch. Project organizer Mark Mangan said “this has been our (the Chamber’s) biggest turnout so far and raised almost $500 for Soup Angels.”

A ride in the 1966 Lincoln Futura — signed by the late actor Adam West, who portrayed Batman — was the raffle prize with proceeds going to the Nyack-based organization. A gentleman named Edwin was the lucky winner, his $5 raffle ticket chosen by Catwoman.

It was Back to the Future for Craig Farr, whose silver 1981 DeLorean was equipped with a flux capacitor autographed by Christopher Lloyd. “That makes time travel possible,” he said. “Since I was young it was my favorite car because of the movie,” he…

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