Thursday’s Doors ~ small town shop: Stone & Sparrow

witlessdatingafterfifty

This store is a delightful one

full of gifts and special items,

including unique clothing,

ones to set aside for perfect

occasions. Oldest daughter

Has good friend, Abby whose

own sister manages this

small town shop on the

main downtown street ~

27 North Sandusky Street

Delaware, Ohio 43015.

Yes, there’s the old

blue and cream

bank building,

now an optometry

location’s reflection.

This choice of doors

was taken on August’s

First Friday.

Our doors are featured on

Norm Frampton’s blog,

although this week

he’s on a

well earned

break!

Check out this location

to find out who his

substitute Host

or Hostess is!

http://miscellaneousmusingsofamiddleagedmind.wordpress.com

I apologize my first release was

an unfinished post, which

ironically hasn’t happened

for quite some time!

Happy doors’

Exploring!

😎 🚪 😊

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Pacific War Museum – Current News

Pacific Paratrooper

re-enactors

During the re-opening of the Living History Programs in the renovated Pacific Combat Zone in March, the volunteers included two students of Asian descent who came from the Dallas area to play the roles of Japanese soldiers. Robert (“Robbie”) Boucher, who is of Vietnamese descent, is a graduate student in history at Texas Christian University. His close friend, Ryan Itoh, whose father is Japanese, just graduated from TCU and will be entering medical school this fall. Both are experienced in reenacting with U.S. Civil War and Indian War groups and became intrigued with becoming involved in reenactments of Pacific War battles.

re-enactors: Robbie Boucher & Ryan Itoh

In Robbie’s view, our Museum’s programs appealed because they offer one of the most unique experiences possible for people interested in history. They allow visitors the opportunity to glimpse ever so slightly into the realities of 75+ years ago, hear the sounds…

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Is Amtrak’s CFO Going To Be Wick Moorman’s Most Lasting Impact On Amtrak?

ntbraymer

By Noel T. Braymer

CFO stands for Chief Financial Officer. One of the first acts made by Wick Moorman when he came to Amtrak was hiring a new CFO. The CFO is a Vice-President level position. A major roll for the CFO at Amtrak is overseeing Amtrak’s accounting. There have been many questions about Amtrak accounting which doesn’t follow the norms of most accounting systems. Accounting is critical in measuring whether an organization is making or losing money and where it is making or losing money. Without this information it is impossible to know what actions are needed by management to reduce unneeded costs or to increase revenues. Mr. Moorman’s choice of a new CFO says a lot about the problems he found at Amtrak and that the CFO will be crucial to turning around Amtrak.

Wick Moorman chose as Amtrak’s CFO William Feidt. Besides both being from Mississippi, William…

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Original June Bug at the Glenn Curtiss Museum

Jazzersten's HDR Blog

One of the oldest airplanes here at the Glenn Curtiss Museum in Hammondsport, N.Y. in the Fingerlakes was the “June Bug”. It was flown by Glenn Curtiss in Hammondsport in 1908. Nearby the museum is the Pleasant Valley Winery with a large field next to it and a plaque. It says that Glenn Curtiss made aviation history here on July 4th, 1908 with the “June Bug” as he flew the plane up to 40 feet high in the air towards Keuka Lake almost a mile. He landed safely and it became the first pre announced and publically witnessed flight of a powered aircraft in the United States. He had an audience of reporters and nearly 1000 people. It won him the Scientific American Trophy. Curtiss worked in conjunction with Alexander Graham Bell. They frequented this valley at the Stony Brook Farm and made many test flights from the oval horse…

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1917 – KENT ISLAND vs. THE UNITED STATES

easternshorebrent

55Courtesy of Kent Island Heritage Society

It was one hundred years ago.

1917.

The end of summer.

Kent Island, like most of the Chesapeake Bay’s Eastern Shore, was still very rural, its sparse population living in close-to-the-soil agricultural communities based around family farms and country stores, or in rough-and-tumble watermen’s enclaves.

Most people didn’t own a car, a telephone, or an indoor bathroom.

The average national annual income was less than $1,000 per year. One in a thousand marriages ended in divorce. Life expectancy was 48 for men and 51 for women.

Prohibition loomed.

War was consuming most of the world around us, and that past April, the United States had joined the fight, the Great War, the global conflagration that would become forever known as the First World War.

One hundred years ago. 1917. End of summer.

That’s when Kent Island went into battle against their own federal government.

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RED “RS-3m”

By the Mighty Mumford

The MARYLAND-DELAWARE did

What I wanted to…

They several RS-3m’s

And painted them so cool!

They probably run Short-Hood forward,

Notice the attached snow plow…

I see an “F” on the frame ahead of the steps–

I want to model it now!

They’ve kept them running with EMD parts,

(INSIDE the ALCO shell)…

All available regionally–

That’s why they’re lasting so well.

It may take a couple of body shells

For me to cut straight…

If my hands ever stop shaking,

A model of this, I’ll make!

–Jonathan Caswell

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The Super Tornado

Windows into History

rochesterSnippets 131.  On 21st August 1883, exactly 134 years ago today, an F5 tornado hit Rochester, Minnesota. F5 is the most severe level of the Fujita scale, described as causing “incredible damage”. Although this is an estimate, as weather observation techniques were not as sophisticated as today, it is pretty clear from news reports that this was a weather event of unusual magnitude. The following quote is from the Winona Daily Republican:

A cyclone struck here about 7pm. The depot is unroofed and badly wrecked. The engine house is a total wreck. The covered bridge, near the city, is all gone. About six or eight cars in the yard are all smashed up… The streets are full of trees and parts of buildings…

The north part of the city is almost a total wreck. It is a bad looking sight.

There are five cars and an engine ditched…

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