A lesson in a dream / Rüyanın içinde bir ders…

YA BAKİ ENTEL BAKİ

semrasworld

sem-love.1

Once upon a time there was a man walking in the jungles where the magnificent nature and long trees. He was enjoying the view of the thick trees covering the sunlight, listening to the birds singing, smelling the odor of the flowers. While he was fascinated by those views. He heard the sound of quick running and Is becoming clearer and nearer, the man turned and saw a great hungry lion coming fast towards him. The empty bellied lion was coming nearer and nearer. The man began to run like the wind with the lion running after him. When the lion became too close the mane noticed this old well. Without thinking the man jumped into it holding a strong rope that dangled inside it.

After a while, he calmed down and the roar of the angry hungry lion faded away. But suddenly he heard the hissing sound of a…

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Understanding Context, Improving Timing Help Avoid Invoice Deductions

Both retailers and suppliers – understand that invoice deductions can be  useful devices for enforcing compliance. In part this is because retailers simply don’t have many tools to really press the issue when suppliers can or will not meet the agreed-upon conditions for product purchase and delivery. Deductions provide some financial redress for buyers, and are a negative incentive for suppliers.
Unfortunately, when invoice deductions are triggered, they can poison or destroy the supplier-customer relationship, causing damage far greater than the issue or issues that activate them.

But deductions (and positive incentives as well) don’t have to be problems. They begin as part of the sales agreement, an understanding between the supplier and the retailer about how they will do business together. Fundamentally this is an agreement to cooperate for the benefit of both businesses, and if it is a good agreement everyone should profit.

Even the best agreements, however, often fail to foresee unexpected difficulties and delays. While problems, in general, can be expected, specific complications are frequently unique and therefore difficult to anticipate.

Fortunately, suppliers and retailers can keep what are usually relatively small issues from turning the relationship adversarial by paying special attention to both context and timing.

French Quarter

mypassengerdiaries

The French Quarter is one of my best experiences in New Orleans. Walking through the streets was like living in the past, where there were pirates and balls and voodoo queens. It was like a quest to find treasures. It was like trying to find out way through a maze. Even though there was no actual destination, every little thing we found was wonderful.

When you think French Quarter, you think Bourbon Street. When you think Bourbon Street, you think of bars and music and nightlife. While that is certainly amazing, there are plenty of other things to do in the French Quarter. Don’t limit yourself to one street…explore everything from one end to the other.

What we’ve found out:

The French Quarter has great shops and little cafés where you can stop and rest when you get tired. It is a very artsy place so you will find a lot of…

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Dark awakening

Perspectives on Life, the Universe and Everything

I woke up after thousand tales
Seeing the earth frail and fail
What have you done to it
What have you done
for your fiendish churlish fun
a million years were wasted
when fossil fuels were tasted
by vampire of human greed
Evolution or annihilation,
only history will judge
two hundreds years carbon smudge
Holding a grudge, against your own
created from the green watery womb
now roaming uptight, arrogance aplomb
forgetting not so distant past
sapiens imagining this will last
forever. And forever more
weakened limbs are sore
and may give up trying to
defend indefensible, reprehensible
act of a kind, only humankind
are able to unleash on its mother
IMG_2369

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Taps for the Good War Myth?

Johns Hopkins University Press Blog

Guest post by Michael C. C. Adams

On May 8, seventy years ago, the Allies accepted the unconditional surrender of Germany (Victory in Europe or VE Day), followed on September 2 by the surrender of our Pacific opponent (Victory over Japan or VJ Day). As we once again ring down the curtain on our commemoration of World War II, it is worth asking whether the Good War myth, spawned by the conflict, is now in eclipse?

The total victories in WWII were an enormous accomplishment, due in good measure to U.S. contributions in manpower, industrial production, and financial strength. There was much to be proud of. America was the only nation to emerge from the war more prosperous and powerful at a relatively modest cost. But, over time, this achievement was magnified into “The Good War.” From the 1960s on, America’s economic world dominance declined and military victories were harder…

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